ANZAC day Activities

20 Dec ANZAC day Activities

25 April is ANZAC day, a significant day in Australian and New Zealand history. The date marks the anniversary of the landing of New Zealand and Australian soldiers – the Anzacs – on the Gallipoli Peninsula in 1915. It was the first major military action for both counties during the First World War.

In honour of this important day we have compiled a list of free resources that our Australian and New Zealand teachers can use to create engaging Activities in Verso. We’ve put some examples of how you could use these below: ANZAC Day: Sacrifice (Secondary School), ANZAC Day: Interviews (Primary School), ANZAC Day: Campaign (Secondary School) and ANZAC Day: Last Post (Primary/Secondary)

Verso Campus subscribers can head straight to the global library here to copy these Activities into their account. Not a subscriber, get in touch to learn how you can upgrade your school.

Anzac Day Resources

Australia Remembers: WW1 1914 -1918
http://www.abc.net.au/news/first-world-war-centenary/

ABC Splash
http://splash.abc.net.au/home#!/topic/1170683/home
and
http://splash.abc.net.au/newsandarticles/blog/-/b/1818164/top-10-resources-to-commemorate-the-anzac-centenary

Imperial War Museum (UK)
http://www.iwm.org.uk/history/15-photos-of-the-anzacs-at-gallipoli
and
http://www.iwm.org.uk/learning/resources/the-gallipoli-campaign

Victoria: Anzac Centenary
http://anzaccentenary.vic.gov.au/get-involved/student-teacher-resources/#shrine


Anzac Day Activities

ad_sacrifice

Anzac Day: Sacrifice

This activity makes use of some of the phenomenal case studies exploring the ethnic diversity of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF).
https://www.awm.gov.au/

To replicate this activity you will need the following link and text:

LINK:
https://www.awm.gov.au/education/schools/resources/anzac-diversity/

TEXT:
Approximately 420,000 Australians enlisted in the AIF during the First World War, including nurses, Indigenous Australians, and Australians with British, Asian, Greek and Northern European heritage. For some, enlisting was difficult.

The introduction of the Commonwealth Defense Act in 1909 excluded any person not “substantially of European descent” from enlisting in the First World War. The Act was in line with the White Australia Policy, which aimed to ensure that Australia retained its white colonial British character.

Read at least 3 of the Australian War Memorial’s powerful case studies exploring the ethnic diversity of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF).

RESPOND: Based on what you have read, what do you think drove these men and women to risk their lives for a country that had not always offered them equality?

COMMENT: Read other students’ responses and comment on whether the reasons given and the risks taken paid off once the war was over. Think about the lasting effect (If any) their sacrifice had on the Australian identity.

Links to the Australian curriculum: History
The content of these stories and classroom activities will provide opportunities to develop historical understanding through:

Key concepts
Sources and evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy and significance, and contestability.

Cross-curriculum priorities
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures, Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia.

General capabilities
Literacy, IT competence, critical and creative thinking, intercultural understanding.


Anzac Day: Interviews

This activity asks students to go into the community in search of the meaning of Anzac Day. In collecting diverse viewpoints the students can synthesize the responses to look for common ground.

To replicate this activity you will need the following link and text:

LINK:
https://www.awm.gov.au/education/schools/resources/anzac-diversity/

TEXT:
Anzac Day means different things to different people. When you get home speak to a parent, grandparent or somebody close to your family and ask them the question, “What does Anzac Day mean to you?”

SHARE: Share the name of the person you interviewed and then share their response.

CARE: Read some other responses and share a reason why you think it is important that we still commemorate this day. Try to use part of their story in your answer. Remember you can comment on many responses so you can give a different reason each time.

Links to the Australian curriculum: History
The content of these stories and classroom activities will provide opportunities to develop historical understanding through:

Key Concepts
Sources of evidence, continuity and change, perspectives, empathy and significance.

General capabilities
Literacy, ICT capability, critical and creative thinking, Personal and social capability and ethical understanding.

ad_interview


ad_campaign

Anzac day: Campaign

This activity asks students to consider the controversy around Woolworths’ 2015 Anzac Day campaign. The “Fresh in Our Memories” website — linking Anzac commemorations to the retailer’s “Fresh Food People” branding tag line — was taken down overnight amid claims that it was in very poor taste. This activity asks students to consider the underlying issues.

To replicate this activity you will need the following link and text:

LINK:
http://www.smh.com.au/national/woolworths-anzac-campaign-hijacked-by-internet-memes-20150415-1ml4gt.html

TEXT:
Woolworths have come under fire for their “Fresh in Our Memories” campaign. Their website encouraged people to change their social media profile picture to one of someone that was involved in the war – a great way of paying tribute to a relative who’s life was touched by the war. However once put through their “profile picture generator” it came out with the words over the top, “Lest We Forget, Anzac 1915-2015″ and “Fresh in our memories” with the Woolworths logo.

The slogan “Fresh in our Memories” offended many and prompted the Veterans’ Affairs Minister to get on to the phone to Woolworths and demand the material be taken down. Woolworths said in a statement, “We regret that our branding on the picture generator has caused offence, this was clearly never our intention.

Like many heritage Australian companies, we were marking our respect for Anzac and our veterans.

We continue to be proud supporters of the RSL and Camp Gallipoli in this important year and look forward to working with them into the future.”

RESPONSE: Do you believe that Woolworths were indeed “marking their respect for Anzac and our veterans?” OR Do you think they had another agenda?

COMMENT: carefully read some responses and think about what your classmates are saying. Whatever their opinion, comment on their response with what you think would be the counter-argument.

Links to the Australian curriculum: History
The content of these stories and classroom activities will provide opportunities to develop historical understanding through:

Key concepts
Sources and evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy and significance, and contestability.

General capabilities
Literacy, IT competence, critical and creative thinking and ethical understanding


ANZAC Day: Last Post

LINK:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-Pz5KsyfN0

TEXT:

In military tradition, the Last Post is the bugle call that signifies the end of the day’s activities. It is also sounded at military funerals to indicate that the soldier has gone to his final rest and at commemorative services such as ANZAC Day and Remembrance Day.

Put your headphones on and listen to the music in the clip.

The Last Post evokes a lot of different emotions in people.

SHARE: Respond in Verso

1. When listening to the music, what type of emotions do you feel and why? Try and explain your reasons.

2. What other music has significant meaning to you and why?

When responding remember that Verso is anonymous. No one but your teacher can see who you are so try and explain your emotions.

CARE: Now find a response that is different to yours but which you like or agree with and leave a comment as feedback.

 

Links to the Australian curriculum: History
The content of these stories and classroom activities will provide opportunities to develop historical understanding through:

Key concepts
Sources and evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy and significance, and contestability.

General capabilities
Literacy, IT competence, critical and creative thinking and ethical understanding

Screen Shot 2016-04-20 at 1.30.18 PM

 

Comments

comments